World Bank Peddling Private, For-Profit Schools In Africa, Disguised As Aid

File: Students pick crops outside a world bank school in Kenya. (Flickr / World Bank Photo Collection)
A row of students study from textbooks beneath a chalkboard at a World Bank School in India. (Flickr / World Bank Photo Collection)
A row of students study from textbooks beneath a chalkboard at a World Bank School in India. (Flickr / World Bank Photo Collection)

Originally published at MintPress News.

EDINBURGH — Private, for-profit schools in Africa funded by the World Bank and U.S. venture capitalists have been criticized by more than 100 organizations who’ve signed a petition opposing the controversial educational venture.

A May statement addressed to Jim Kim, president of the World Bank, expressed deep concern over the global financial institution’s investment in a chain of private primary schools targeting poor families in Kenya and Uganda and called on the institution to support free universal education instead.

The schools project is called Bridge International Academies and 100,000 pupils have enrolled in 412 schools across the two nations. BIA is supported by the World Bank, which has given $10 million to the project, and a number of investors, including U.S. venture capitalists NEA and Learn Capital. Other notable investors include Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Pierre Omidyar and Pearson, a multinational publishing company.

In a speech delivered in April, Kim praised BIA as a means to alleviate poverty in Kenya and Uganda. Critics responded that many Kenyans and Ugandans cannot afford private education, further arguing that this type of investment merely supports Western businesses at the expense of local public services.

A section of the letter addressed to Kim asserts:

“We, civil society organisations and citizens of Kenya and Uganda, are appalled that an organisation whose mandate is supposed to be to lift people out of poverty shows such a profound misunderstanding and disconnect from the lives and rights of poor people in Kenya and Uganda. If the World Bank is serious about improving education in Kenya and Uganda, it should support our governments to expand and improve our public education systems, provide quality education to all children free of charge, and address other financial barriers to access.”

 

Opposition to educational neocolonialism

The statement reflects a growing global movement questioning Western policies pushing private education in developing countries. It was written and signed by 30 organizations in Uganda and Kenya and supported by 116 organizations around the world, including Global Justice Now and ActionAid. They claim BIA uses highly standardized teaching methods, untrained low-paid teachers, and aggressive marketing strategies targeted at poor households.

In his speech supporting BIA, Kim said that “average scores for reading and math have risen high above their public school peers.” Opponents questioned these figures, noting that they appear to have been taken directly from a study conducted by BIA itself.

Global Justice Now added that the World Bank president’s assertion that the “the cost per student at Bridge Academies is just $6 dollars a month” was misleading.

“This suggestion that $6 is an acceptable amount of money for poor households to pay reveals a profound lack of understanding of the reality of the lives of the poorest,” Global Justice Now, a London-based organization promoting social justice, wrote on its website in May.

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Aerospace company patents a terrible idea for airplane seating arrangement

Screen shot 2015-07-20 at 8.43.37 AMZodiac Aerospace, a large global aerospace supplier headquartered in France, has come up with an idea to squeeze more passengers on a plane: turn the middle seat in a three-seat row around, and eliminate the armrests. This way, the middle seat passenger will face the passengers in the aisle and window seats.

The Oregonian calls Zodiac’s idea to “jam even more of us into economy class” a patented rendition of “airline seating from hell.

Yes, as if air travel is not bad enough, now a French company named Zodiac Aerospace has patented its “solution” to the problem of how to jam even more of us into economy class. They do it by plac[ing] seats in an alternating pattern of forward-facing and rear-facing seats, using flip-up seats to allow access.

Christopher Elliott, who writes the Travel Troubleshooter column (seen in Sunday A&E print section), is no fan of this concept: “These seats are the latest bad idea in a series of bad ideas on how to squeeze more passengers on the plane.

“When I see a seat concept like this, my first thought is: There ought to be a law against it. I mean, shouldn’t we have minimum seat standards in the United States? We already have rules for how you treat dogs in the cargo hold — why not for people?”

Elliott has noted in past columns that the pitch, or distance between seats, has been whittled away over the years as airlines cram more people in. And airlines have also slimmed the width of seats to get an extra seat per row when possible.

Zodiac presents the idea in a video, claiming short haul/high density with “no more elbow fights,” foldable seats, a cup holder, and a literature pocket:


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