David Koch’s Special Access to Governor Scott Walker

On Wednesday, Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin received a phone call from a man he believed to be David Koch, multi-billionaire energy monopolist.  The caller wasn’t Koch, but an imposter.   The left side of America went berserk upon listening to soundbites of the phone call, believing they had listened to the devil admit he was the devil.  In the end, of course, Walker wasn’t and isn’t the devil.  He said pretty much the same things to the man he believed was Koch as he has been saying publicly all along.

I wasn’t upset at all by the things he said.  Nevertheless, I was upset.

It’s not about the soundbites or Walker’s words.  What I’m upset about is that a multi-billionaire can simply pick up the phone and reach an American Governor any time he wants to, even if that governor is not his governor.  There’s a lesson here for America, and especially for our politicians that won’t be learned because no one is talking about it.

How does a rich man supposedly previously unknown to Walker, a man not living in Wisconsin as a resident, pick up his phone, dial Walker’s office, and be connected to the Governor of Wisconsin for a twenty-minute conversation?  How does that happen, exactly?  Is Governor Walker this easily reached by everyone?

That last question was rhetorical; of course Governor Walker isn’t so accessible to his constituents.  No politician in this country is.  But for some reason, if you have millions upon billions of dollars, and you might just be a large contributor to the “Party”, you’ve got access.  You’ve got so much access that you get twenty minutes of a very busy governor’s time.  Twenty minutes.  Think about that.

The access of the wealthy and famous to our leaders is part of what is wrong in this nation, and probably something that our founding fathers would have wished to avoid.  Walker, and our other leaders don’t even care about the appearance of class access to leadership, much less the actual thing.  This is the height of political arrogance; a belief that as a leader, you can grant special access to the wealthy and famous, access available to no other constituent, and not be accountable for it.

I didn’t hear a single person in our news media, from the Right or the Left, mention the problems that this kind of special access create.  Why not?  Because it’s business as usual, and that should be sufficient cause for concern about the direction our nation is headed in.  Apparently, if I have millions of dollars and may be a potential contributor to Mr. Walker’s next campaign, I can access him anytime I want.  But if you are not me, and you do not have millions, you cannot.  Fair enough?     ?

Comments are closed.