McCarthy’s office couldn’t help but take their debunk from political distortion to completely made up balderdash.

The Affordable Care Act will not fulfill many of the bigger promises President Obama once made. If Republicans would just focus on how the law falls short of Obama’s benchmarks they would have plenty of political fodder, but they seem compelled to push their attacks so far they become completely unhinged from reality.

A perfect example is the post from the office of House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) “Debunking Obamacare’s 7 million Enrollment Success Story.” The piece starts with a few relatively legitimate data points about how some people won’t pay their premiums, but concludes with totally disapproval nonsense.

According to a survey by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, about 15-20% of the enrollees have failed or will fail to continue payment of their required premiums. McKinsey & Co. found that “More than three-quarters of those who reported having obtained coverage also said they had paid their premium” and Goldman Sachs estimated that about 80% of people who are “enrolled” will actually effectuate enrollment. [...]

Applying these estimates, less than 6 million people will have signed up and paid. And of the enrollees, only 1/3 are estimated to be newly insured.  Meaning, after spending $2 trillion dollars Obamacare will have only signed up an additional 2 million people through the exchanges. Is this the Administration’s definition of success?

This number sounds insane because it is entirely not true. The $2 trillion number likely comes from the estimated amount that will eventually be spent on all Obamacare programs over the next ten years. While significantly more money than was necessary was spent on expanding coverage through the exchanges, so far the total comes nowhere close to $2 trillion. So McCarthy’s office shows themselves to be idiots or liars. Either way, any sane person would see this “debunk” has been discredited.

The truly bizarre thing is that if they used the actual numbers for total ACA spending by the end of this year, which is roughly around $50 billion, it still would make the law sound wasteful. Instead though, McCarthy’s office couldn’t help but take their debunk from political distortion to completely made up balderdash.