Maybe if the media had done a better job pointing out Obama’s “if you like it you can keep it” promise was lie he wouldn’t have used it so often to stifle legitimate critics and we’d have a better bill

The most frustrating thing about the current media focus on the problems with Obamacare is that there seems to be zero recognition that many of these potential problems were known about when the law was draft and at least some people wrote about them extensively.

A perfect example of this occurred today when Sharyl Attkisson of CBS News tried to pretend information that was in a public Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report published four years ago is a “scoop.”

From CBS News:

The Obama administration is promising the federal health care website, HealthCare.gov, will run smoothly by the end of this weekend. However, with that self-imposed deadline approaching, CBS News’ Sharyl Attkisson learned some of those who get their insurance through work are losing their coverage.

Attkisson said on “CBS This Morning” that she learned that the government had earlier estimated that millions of workers would be dropped from their employee insurance under the Affordable Care Act, and for some it’s already happening.

This was not some secret. This was a well known and much discussed byproduct of the law’s design. The CBO addressed it repeatedly for over a year. For example in March 2010 the CBO wrote:

Between 8 million and 9 million other people who would be covered by an employment-based plan under current law would not have an offer of such coverage under the proposal. Firms that would choose not to offer coverage as a result of the proposal would tend to be smaller employers and employers that predominantly employ lower-wage workers—people who would be eligible for subsidies through the exchanges—although some workers who would not have employment-based coverage because of the proposal would not be eligible for such subsidies. Whether those changes in coverage would represent the dropping of existing coverage or a lack of new offers of coverage is difficult to determine.

One of my many complaints against the Affordable Care Act is that it used a terrible free rider provision instead of the better designed employer mandate in the House bill. The House’s employer mandate would have resulted in far few companies dropping coverage.

Maybe if the media had done a better job pointing out Obama’s “if you like it you can keep it” promise was lie at the time, he wouldn’t have used it so often to stifle legitimate criticism and we might have ended up with a better bill.

These perfectly predictable results of the law do not qualify as “breaking news.”