While most Americans don’t think immigration reform is a top concern at this time, they do overwhelmingly support all the basic components of a potential deal. The vast majority of Americans support creating a way for undocumented immigrants already here to stay, as well as measures to slow undocumented immigration in the future. From Gallup:

Next, suppose that on Election Day you could vote on key issues as well as candidates. Would you vote for or against a law that would -- [RANDOM ORDER]? January 2013 results

Support for these proposals is not only strong overall but broadly trans-partisan. Gallup found a majority of Democrats, Republicans and Independents support every one of the five proposed changes. Even 59 percent of Republicans support a pathway to legal residency or citizenship.

President Obama has substantial leverage to try to force House Republicans to act on a broad immigration reform law. Failing to do so would not only continue to hurt the party with Hispanics but would also risk alienating a large swath of voters. Being seen as the party that block reform would be a really bad political move for the GOP as a whole.