Boehner's passion to repeal Obamacare has not subsided

If you thought the re-election of President Obama would dampen the Republican opposition to Obamacare you were mistaken.

Not only are several Republican governors continuing to oppose the law in every way possible, but the Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner is still actively rallying the base against it. Boehner just penned an op-ed saying he would continue to use every tactic he has to fight for the law’s full repeal, including trying to get the law repealed as part of any deficit deal:

The tactics of our repeal efforts will have to change. But the strategic imperative remains the same. If we’re serious about getting our economy moving again, solving our debt and restoring prosperity for American families, we need to repeal Obamacare and enact common-sense, step-by-step reforms that start with lowering the cost of health care.

The president’s health care law adds a massive, expensive, unworkable government program at a time when our national debt already exceeds the size of our country’s entire economy. We can’t afford it, and we can’t afford to leave it intact. That’s why I’ve been clear that the law has to stay on the table as both parties discuss ways to solve our nation’s massive debt challenge.

When it comes to a possible Grand Bargain, Boehner’s insistence on including the Affordable Care Act as part of any deal probably increases the chance of the negotiations failing. Obama will be reluctant to agree to anything that he sees as undermining his legacy, but this strengthens the hand of the more conservative parts of the Republicans caucus who are unwilling to make a deal.

Boehner’s continued public opposition to the ACA has some real policy implications for health care. That fact that top Republican leaders are still publicly fighting the law after the election almost guarantees that implementation of the law will be an incredible mess. Democrats foolishly chose to make the success of the law heavily dependent upon state officials working hard to implement it, and that is unlikely to happen in states controlled by Republicans.