Jonathan Capehart in the Washington Post:

If gays and lesbians want big victories, such as the repeal of DOMA and the "don’t ask don’t tell" policy, they should focus their fire where it belongs: on Congress. Each bill will take 218 votes in the House and 60 in the Senate to reach the president’s desk, and the votes aren’t there yet.

Pam Spaulding responds:

OK. Who said Congress shouldn’t be held accountable? But where does it get its cues from — the White House. Come on, we’re not stupid. We’ve heard apologists say that Obama’s rogue DOJ issued that brief without anyone in the WH knowing. Gee, when Bush was in the White House, we sure nailed the fact that Alberto Gonzales was working hand-in-glove with Dear Leader’s constitutional wrecking crew at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. So which is it people? I’m tired of the excuses, and bad ones at that. 

Michelangelo Signoreli on the White House A-list gay party planned for next week:

But now, a cocktail party? No, that’s not business — it’s schmoozing and sucking up, and it’s all about buying off gay leaders by seducing them, very cheaply, so the White House can help get the money coming back in, since the DNC gay fundraiser for next week is collapsing. The response so far has only been about the money and it’s not nearly enough.

John Aravosis:

It’s a chance for our leaders to get used by the White House, just by showing up, then get used again when they leave and tell the world how all the champagne and caviar proves that the President really does love us, in spite of that pesky incest and pedophilia thing, and those two gay service members a day he’s still discharging, even though he doesn’t have to.

DOMA and DODT aren’t just gay issues, they’re progressive issues.  And the problem with pushing the progressive agenda with the White House is always the same:  they have bought the entire progressive infrastructure off for the price of a few cocktail parties and and the opportunity to be on the "inside." 

They’ll run that play again and again until progressives make that situation uncomfortable for everyone involved at the grassroots level.